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#NewYearNewYou – Annual Checkups, Health Screenings

New Year – Annual Checkups, Health Screenings

Youa��re in good health. You physically feel fine.

No colds and other medical ailments to date.

So, why should you see a doctor and/or specialist for annual check-up, testings or screenings?A�

Getting annual check-ups, testings and/or screenings can inform, alert or provide insights of one’s health.A�Most people only have a test or screening if they have symptoms or risks factors. But in short, some medical issues come with little to no symptoms, while others can lay dormant and quiet for years without any precursors. For example, some common medical conditions including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes come with little to no signs or warnings, but usually made aware out of the result of another compromising factor.

However, other more pressing medical conditions such as HPV, skin & melanoma and cancers can linger for any duration of period within the body and without warnings.The key with managing these and many other diseases and conditions is to catch them early so they be managed and kept under control before they become serious threats to your health and well-being.

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Age, Gender & Extracurricular Factors Play Risks.

A lot of what happens during your annual physical will depend on your age, gender, medical history and risk factors. Your doctor will check the condition of your heart, lungs, circulatory system and auditory system. You may need blood tests as follow-up.

Are your immunizations up-to-date? Some vaccinations you had as a child may require boosters. Depending on your age, your doctor also may recommend you get vaccinated against shingles, hepatitis A and B, human papilloma virus and pneumonia.

If you were born between 1945 and 1965, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends you be screened for Hepatitis C.

At your annual physical, your doctor also will check your height and weight and discuss lifestyle habits that can improve your health such as eating a heart-healthy diet and getting regular exercise.

Cancer Screenings are Vital.

In addition to your annual physical, it’s important you adhere to recommended cancer screenings for your age and gender. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against routine screening (total body examination by a doctor) to find skin cancers early for people who do not have a history of skin cancer and who do not have any suspicious moles or other spots. All others, report any unusual moles or changes in your skin to your doctor. Also talk to your doctor if you are at increased risk of skin cancer.

Each year more than a million people in the United States are diagnosed with the most common forms of skin cancer a�� basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma a�� which together are known as non-melanoma skin cancers. Fortunately there are ways to detect most non-melanoma skin cancers early, when they are curable.

Genital human papilloma virus (HPV) is a very common virus. Some doctors think ita��s almost as common as the cold virus. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that about 14 million people get a new HPV infection every year in the US. HPV vaccines can prevent infection with the types of HPV most likely to cause cancer and genital warts

  • – In women, the HPV test checks for the virus, not cell changes. The test can be done at the same time as the Pap test, with the same swab or a second swab. You wona��t notice a difference in your exam if you have both tests. A Pap test plus an HPV test (called co-testing) is the preferred way to find early cervical cancers or pre-cancers in women 30 and older.
  • The American Cancer Society recommends that women aged 30 to 65 have an HPV test with their Pap test (co-testing) every 5 years to test for cervical cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider about co- testing. Ita��s also OK to continue just to have Pap tests every 3 years.
  • – Men are encouraged to have a prostate-specific antigen blood test and digital rectal exam to look for early signs of prostate cancer.

Sexual Testing & STD/STI Screenings.

Young adults under 25 have the highest rates of STIs, but you can get an STI at any point of age. The most common STIs include chlamydia, gonorrhoea, herpes, syphilis and genital, anal, or penile warts.

According to a latest studies which states that the number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among the 50 to 70 age group have soared by 38% in the last three years.

STI is an infection that you get from another person during sexual activity. Often this means that the virus, parasite, or bacteria is living in your sexual partnera��s semen or vaginal fluid and gets into your body through your vagina, the urethra of your penis, your anus, or your mouth, but some are transmitted through skin to skin contact.

STIs only show up on the tests a few weeks after a potential incident. This is because these tests often arena��t looking for the virus or bacteria in your body. Instead, they search for the antibodies your immune system has created to fight off the invading infection. It takes your body a few days to create these antibodies, which means it takes time for the test to pick up on them.

Each STI has a different lag time between when you get it and when it will show up on a test.

  • You can test positive for gonorrhea or chlamydia in two weeks.
  • Syphilis can show up in one week or take three months to surface on a test.
  • HIV and Hepatitis B and C can show up as early as one month on a rapid test (the one that takes 20 minutes to get results), but in certain cases it can take six months to show.

Additional Health Tests & Procedures.

Some 30 million women in the United States have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men), according to the American Academy of Dermatology, though that figure does not include the millions more who struggle with thinning hair because of pregnancy, menopause, stress and other health conditions.

Platelet-rich plasma showing promising results treating hair loss. The non-surgical procedure uses platelet-rich plasma known as PRP. PRP is taken directly from the patienta��s blood, then placed in a machine where it spins and separates. The platelets contain hundreds of proteins called growth factors which help heal injuries. For years, platelet-rich plasma has been used to treat tendon injuries in famous athletes like Tiger Woods and Victor Cruz. But now, doctors are using the healing properties to help regrow hair.

  • -Studies show PRP works best in thinning hair.

  • PRP Patients can expect 25-25% more growth and increased thickness in existing hair after treatment.

Currently Advanced Dermatology Associates is offering Free PRP Hair Restoration Therapy Consultation at 200 Central Park South, Suite 107. To scheduleA�your hair consultation, please contact:A�prp.advderm@gmail.com

The art of living your optimum health basically begins with the actions you’ve already embarked upon. Start living your best life today. The key to living your best life is being able to live knowingly in control of whatever condition of illness you may be facing. The sooner you can can take control and manage your medical being; theA�earlier you can become more successful at managing and keeping watch as they become serious threats to your health.

 

Annual Checkups, Health Screenings - Checklist

 

Anal Sex Myths – Cancer, Infections & Prevention

ANAL SEX – Hidden Taboo…A�No More.

Anal sex was once a thing of hidden or shunned mystery indulged by a select few. However, anal sex is no longer quite the dreaded dark hidden taboo it once was.

An estimated 90% of men who have sex with men and as many as 5% to 10% of sexually active women engage in receptive anal intercourse. Not only has society become more accepting of the evolving relationships involving the same sex, but more heterosexual people are trying it and enjoying it more often than ever before. Recent surveys A�estimate that 40 percent of women between the ages of 20 to 24 have tried anal sex, and 20 percent of all women have tried it in the last year.

However, there are still unclear truths or inaccurate facts (myths) around anal sex, anal cancer and the associated sexual infections. When it comes to anal sex and the topic of anal cancers, HPV; knowing the associated truths can make a difference in knowing the best methods of protection to decrease risks and treatment options.

ANAL SEX MYTHS:A�Cancer, Infections & Prevention

1.A�ANAL SEX CAUSES ANAL CANCER

Basically yes, anal sex is a risk factor for anal cancer.

Anal sex can transmit the human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV in turn leaves the cells around our rectum more vulnerable to mutating and becoming cancerous. A similar risk exists wherever HPV rears its ugly microscopic head, including the mouth, throat, and cervix. And because anal sex is generally more damaging to the inner lining of the rectum than the stereotypical notion of heterosexual sex is to the vagina, HPV and other sexually transmitted infections are more easily spread between people who engage in anal sex. Similarly, the greater number of sexual partners, the greater the risk of cancer.

2.A�ANAL CANCER RATES ARE ALARMING.

Close to 90 percent of anal cancer cases can be traced back to HPV. But the cancer itself is relatively rare.

More white women get HPV-associated anal cancer than women of other races. More black men get HPV-associated anal cancer than men of other races.

According to The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons:

  • – 8,000 people will be newly diagnosed with anal cancer this year.
  • – About 8,080 new cases (5,160 in women and 2,220 in men)
  • – About 1,080 deaths (640 in women and 440 in men)

3.A�ANAL CANCER IS PREVENTABLE.

Like other forms of cancer fueled by HPV, the available HPV vaccine can likely cut down the risk of developing anal cancer in both men and women.

While HPV vaccination rates still arena��t anywhere near as high as wea��d like them to be, there is already evidence that the vaccine has lowered the risk of later cervical cancer in teen girls.

A growing number of gay physicians and health activists now believe that routine screening, using an anal pap smear, could reduce the incidence of anal cancer as dramatically as it has cervical cancer in women. They recommend that all MSMs, especially those who are HIV+, be tested every 1-3 years depending on their immunological well-being and CD4 count.

 

A�4.A�ANAL CANCER IS SCREENABLE.

In fact, a standardized screening protocol for anal cancer does not yet exist. Most health care providers are not offering anal cancer screening to their patients, either because they are unaware of the risk factors for anal cancer, do not inquire about their patients’ high risk sexual practices, and/or do not know how to perform an anal pap smear.

While only one of these locations is screened routinely (the cervix), there are screening tests that you can request from your doctor for the other locations. For women, a simple pap smear is used to detect these cell changes in the cervix in their early stages.

There seems to be little consensus on the practicality of offering anal pap smears to all clients, despite the fact that the AIDS Institute of New York recommends that HIV positive gay men “and others with history of HPV disease” should be tested annually. A�In addition, most health insurance policies do not cover anal pap smears.

5.A�ANAL CANCER IS GAY DISEASE – ORA�MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN (MSM)

This is a big myth. Approximately 75% of all sexually active adults acquire HPV, often within the course of early adulthood, and often in the first two years of becoming sexually active and often without any symptoms.

Each year anal cancer is diagnosed in about 2 people out of every 100,000 people in the general population. Current estimates are that HIV negative MSMs are 20 times more likely to be diagnosed with anal cancer. Their rate is about 40 cases per 100,000. HIV-positive MSMs are up to 40 times more likely to diagnosed with the disease, resulting in a rate of 80 anal cancer cases per 100,000 people.

6.A�ANAL CANCER HAS VISIBLE SYMPTOMS.

Not always true. Although many men have no obvious symptoms, one of the most common manifestations of HPV infection is genital warts which can affect the anus, the penis and/or the peritoneum. Other possible symptoms are abnormal discharge from the anus, bleeding from the rectum and anus, itching of the anus, pain or pressure around the anus, and a sore or sores around the anus that do not heal.

7.A�A�Ia��M NOT PROMISCUOUS, SO I DONa��T HAVE TO WORRY.

Wrong – HPV is transferable through skin to skin contact. So, yes, you reduce your chances of getting HPV if you practice safer sex and exercise monogamy when it comes to sexual partners.This means using a latex condom during anal and vaginal sex, and using a dental dam or a condom during oral sex. You can protect sex toys with a latex condom, too… and always make sure to change the condom or wash the toy if you switch from the vagina to the anus or the other way around.

However, STIs can be passed along as readily in a loving, long-term relationship as in a one-night stand. Remember, though, that HPV can infect areas that arena��t covered by a condom or dental dam, so safer sex isna��t foolproof.

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Preventing Anal InfectionA�& Cancer

The only way to completely avoid anal sex risks is to abstain from anal sex. If you do engage in anal sex, it is always important to use a condom to protect against the spread of infections and diseases.

Sex Tips:A�Decreasing Anal Sex Risks

  • Avoid inserting a penis into the mouth or vagina after it’s been inserted in the anus until your partner puts on a new condom.
  • Use plenty of lubricant to reduce the risk of tissue tears. With latex condoms, always use a water-based lubricant.
  • Relax prior to insertion of the penis to help reduce the risk of tears. Taking a warm bath before anal sex or lying on your stomach may make insertion easier.
  • Stop if anal sex is painful.
  • If you experience bleeding after anal sex or you notice a sores or lumps around the anus or a discharge coming from it, see your doctor as soon as possible.

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