Casual Sex vs Relationship Sex

SEX – just as individuals, comes in all different shapes, sizes and types. From the start, as men and women, wea��re wired differently and our manners in how we approach sex are as complex. In todaya��s world of choices, therea��s more options on the table involving sex.

So before you jump head on into the heated sex conversation, leta��s explore the differences in being in a casual sexual situation versus a committed/relationship sex. Depending on your current dating status, ita��s a decision that could impact your health, life and future.

Which Yields More Tangible Returns – Casual Sex vs Relationship Sex?

Casual Sex -A�Basically, ita��s the friends with benefits (FWB) or hookups – A�or sexual activity that takes places outside of a romantic relationship and implies an absence of commitment, emotional attachment, or familiarity between sexual partners. Examples are sex in casual relationships, one-night stands, extramarital sex, prostitution, or swinging.

This doesna��t necessarily mean therea��s no sense of responsibility or care. In a casual encounter youa��re likely to focus on the here and now. You can enjoy the moment without much thought about what your partner thinks of you or what you think of them. Without the emotional complications of a relationship, youa��re free to concentrate on physical satisfaction.

In casual sex, the relationship never changes because it’s just sex and either person can meet someone at any time and abandon the arrangement.

For many people, not being too familiar with the sex partner is the fuel to casual sex. They find the mystery exciting and, if therea��s no chance of meeting again, inhibitions can easily be forgotten. You can role play as a new identity and act out a secret fantasy with little to NO fear of rejection.

Casual sex has risk, mystery, urgency and may focus on physical (sexual) satisfaction.

Danger is oftentimes a part of casual sex. Therea��s a sense yearning for being naughty, of tasting the forbidden fruit or someone elsea��s property. Some people enhance their sexual encounters by choosing public places or partners they feel should be off-limits.

As children, wea��re told that casual sex is wrong or forbidden. Therefore, whata��s more exciting than doing something so wrong.. When it feels so liberating?

In 2014, a study published in the Journal of Sex Research looked at single, heterosexual college students age 18 to 25. The research found that a greater proportion of men (18.6%) than women (7.4%) said theya��d had casual sex in the past month. Unlike the 2009 study, researchers found that, regardless of gender, casual sex was negatively associated with psychological well being and positively correlated with psychological distress. Based on this, the research team concluded, a�?For emerging-adult college students, engaging in casual sex may elevate risk for negative psychological outcomes.a�?

Relationship Sex -A�in a committed or defined relationship – Relationship sex provides the opportunity to show affection and get as close as possible to one another.

During this period sex can be very exciting. Therea��s still some of the a�?mysterya�� of casual sex and also some risk, but the difference is that sex is more mutual when people are a�?in lovea�?, care about or have some bond of relationship.

Scientists have discovered that the biochemical state of falling in love is similar to obsessive compulsive disorder. a�? During this period sex can be very exciting. There’s still some of the mysterya�Y of casual sex and also some risk, but the difference is that sex is more mutual when people are a�?in lovea�?. When a relationship matures, sex matures. You now have the advantage of knowing each other well. Fear of rejection is replaced with trust and security.

This allows you to move into a stage of experimentation and mutual growth. You can take the time to fine-tune your skills as a lover.

In committed or relationship situation, the dynamics change. Each person has the ability to vocalize their wants from the relationship. A committed relationship is something you can discuss openly. Texting, Netflix and chilling – Don’t Make a Committed Relationship. It’s Communication.

Is Sexual Choice Influenced By Partner Supply.

Herea��s where an established body of literature in sociology and demography a�� called mating market theory (MMT) a�� can help out. According to MMT, relationship preferences are expected to follow not simply from these fixed biological propensities, but also to be heavily influenced by partner availability.

If we think of the number of men and women in market terms, namely supply and demand, the rarer sex has more bargaining power in the market place. Individuals of the less numerous sex are more likely to get their way because they are awash with options. In theory, they can, if not pleased with a relationship, or terms therein, easily replace a disappointing partner.

The more abundant sex, by contrast, has fewer outside options and must cater to the preferences of the rarer sex.

For example, when there are extra women, men face a favorable market and can behave promiscuously, offering little parental investment to their mates. However, when women are in short supply, they can demand relationship faithfulness and commitment a�� with men responding because female partners are rare and therefore a valued resource. And if hea��s out on the prowl, so may she be!

Remember Healthy Sex Is a Mind-Set.

Protect Yourself. Choose Your Sexual Partners Wisely.

The take-home point is this: context matters. Yes, men and women likely employ different strategies to find partners because of biological differences, but these strategies are strongly affected by partner availability and desires.

Consider that the choice you decide to take and understand the differences. Weigh out the best returns for yourself to fully understand where the best answer truly lies for you. Ita��s starts with A�self-valuing yourself from the start.

 

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