Tag - anal warts treatment

Anal Warts & Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure – Treatment & Symptoms

Experiencing Pains ‘in the Buttock’?

One of the most typical health conditions confused with hemorrhoids is anal warts. They are sorta the samea�� yet they stem from entirely different causes and therefore are treated in very different methods. Anal warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus is highly contagious and often transmitted through sexual intercourse or skin-to-skin contact. An anal fissure is a small tear in the thin, moist tissue (mucosa) that lines the anus.

The major distinction of course is the occurrence of pain.

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Anal Pains & Conditions:A�Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Fissure

What are Anal Warts?

Anal warts (also called “condyloma acuminata”) are a condition that affects the area around and inside the anus. They may also affect the skin of the genital area. They first appear as tiny spots or growths, perhaps as small as the head of a pin, and may grow quite large and cover the entire anal area. They usually appear as a flesh or brownish color. Usually, they do not cause pain or discomfort and patients may be unaware that the warts are present. Some patients will experience symptoms such as itching, bleeding, mucus discharge and/or a feeling of a lump or mass in the anal area. Anal warts are caused by HPV and can be transmitted by direct contact ie. basically any contact exposure to the anal area (hand contact, secretions from a sexual partner) can result in HPV infection .

HPV infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

What are Anal Fissures?

An anal fissure is a small tear or crack in the lining of the anus. It may occur when passing large or hard stools, straining during childbirth, or experiencing bouts of diarrhea.A�An anal fissure is usually a minor condition that goes away within six weeks. Home treatments can help ease pain and promote healing.

Causes of Anal Fissure

Anal fissure can occur as a result of any circumstance that puts excessive pressure on the lining of the anus. Thus there are a variety of causes, which may include:

  • – Constipation with large or impacted stools
  • – Chronic or persistent diarrhea
  • – Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohna��s disease)
  • – Childbirth
  • – Infections such as syphilis, herpes, HIV or tuberculosis
  • – Cancer

What areA�Hemorrhoids?

On the other hand, are a very painful condition. Symptoms of hemorrhoids are anal itching, pain (especially while sitting), blood on stool, and lumps near the anus. Increased pressure in the veins of the anus causes hemorrhoids. This is why hemorrhoids are common during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Hemorrhoids result from weak points in hemorrhoid veins below your skin or mucous tissue. As the weak spot gives way, it stretches out and takes surrounding tissue by using it. Traumatized hemorrhoids may get infected with a number of bacteria and/or viruses, but infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoid symptoms may include finding bright red blood on your toilet paper or seeing blood in the toilet after a bowel movement. Other common symptoms include rectal pain, pressure, burning, and itching. You may also be able to feel a lump in your anal area.

Hemorrhoids are common and usually not too serious. They can often be treated with home remedies, and you may not even need to be seen by a doctor.

But some symptoms of hemorrhoids, especially rectal bleeding, may also be caused by other diseases, some of them serious, like colon cancer.

Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure Treatment NYC

Treatment of Anal Conditions

Anal Warts Screenings, Tests & Checks:

Anal warts and hemorrhoids can both seem like lumps or masses of tissue round the anal area. However, there are difference scan result in a proper identification upon near inspection of the area.

Anal warts testing demands that your doctor may inquire as to the presence or absence of risk factors to include a history of anal intercourse, a positive HIV test or a chronically weakened immune system (medications for organ transplant patients, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, etc).

Anal wartsa�� physical examination should focus primarily on the anorectal examination and evaluation of the perineum (pelvic region) that includes the penile or vaginal area to look for warts. A�Digital rectal examination should be performed to rule out any mass. A�Anoscopy is typically performed to look within the anal canal for additional warts. A�This involves inserting a small instrument about the size of a finger into your anus to help visualize the area. A�Speculum examination may also be performed to aid in vaginal examination in women.

Hemorrhoids Treatment & Care:

Hemorrhoids, have a smooth texture thata��s identical towards the tissue they originate from, regardless of whether thata��s external skin or inner mucous membrane. They are often soft or a�?squishya�? to touch, and they range in size from how big a pea to the size of the grape. Youa��ll never find them anywhere except right round the anal opening.

Hemorrhoids are usually best treated in your own home through a high-fiber diet, a proper amount of exercise, and easily obtained over-the-counter relief. Home remedies often work nicely on hemorrhoids and surgery is just rarely needed.

Hemorrhoids are often kept away by keeping the lifestyle changes that were made to assist cure them.

You should seek treatment for hemorrhoid symptoms if:

  • You have rectal bleeding for the first time.
  • You have heavy rectal bleeding.
  • – You have rectal bleeding that is not responding to home care.
  • – You have other hemorrhoid symptoms, such as pain, pressure, itching, and burning, that do not respond to home care after a few days.
  • – You have hemorrhoid symptoms along with other symptoms such as fever, weight loss, abdominal pain, or a change in bowel habits.

Anal WartsA�Treatment:

Anal warts, however, always have to be handled surgically, usually on an outpatient foundation. The warts will not go away by themselves. Instead, a physician has to make use of liquid nitrogen to freeze all of them off.

If warts are not removed, they can grow larger and multiply. Left untreated, warts may lead to an increased risk of anal cancer in the affected area. Internal anal warts may not respond to topical medications, so surgery may be required.

Anal warts will frequently come back for no cause under your control, because the virus can reside dormant in your skin cells for a long period. Post-treatment care and doctor’s supervision are often stressed to minimize chances of future outbreaks. When warts come back, they can usually be treated at your surgeon’s office. If a large number of new warts develop quickly, surgery may be needed again.

Treatment options for anal warts include:

  • Topical medication: These creams usually work best if the warts are very small and located only on the skin around the anus.
  • – Topical medications that will freeze the warts (liquid nitrogen)
  • – Topical medications that will burn the warts (Trichlorocetic acid, podophyllin)
  • – Surgery: When the warts are either too large for the above mentioned treatments or are internal, surgery is considered. During surgery, the warts are surgically removed. The patient will be anesthetized for the procedure. The type of anesthetic depends on the number and exact location of the warts being removed. When there are many warts, your surgeon may perform the surgery in stages.
  • – An internal examination will also be performed so that any lesions on the inside can also be found and treated.

 

Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure: Anal Conditions & Treatment

Top Anal Cancer Myths – HPV Video

Anal sex is no longer quite the dreaded dark hidden taboo it once was.

Not only has society become more accepting of the evolving relationships involving the same sex, but more heterosexual people are trying it and enjoying it more often than ever before. Recent surveys A�estimate that 40 percent of women between the ages of 20 to 24 have tried anal sex, and 20 percent of all women have tried it in the last year.

When it comes to anal sex and the topic of anal cancers, the dialogues and conversations around HPV begin to drastically vary. Then the topic of those discussions begin to be shaped by many stigmas and false perceptions which arena��t always accurate, truthful or informative to our society’s best understanding.

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In this blog, we discuss and share…..

The Top Anal Cancer Myths – video included

 

  1. 1.A�ANAL SEX CAUSES CANCER

In theory, this is yes, anal sex is a risk factor for anal cancer.A�Anal sex can transmit the human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV in turn leaves the cells around our rectum more vulnerable to mutating and becoming cancerous.

A similar risk exists wherever HPV rears its ugly microscopic head, including the mouth, throat, and cervix. And because anal sex is generally more damaging to the inner lining of the rectrum than the stereotypical notion of heterosexual sex is to the vagina, HPV and other sexually transmitted infections are more easily spread between people who engage in anal sex. Similarly, the greater number of sexual partners, the greater the risk of cancer.

  1. 2.A�ANAL CANCER RATES ARE ALARMING.

Close to 90 percent of anal cancer cases can be traced back to HPV. But the cancer itself is relatively rare.

According to The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons:

  • – About 8,080 new cases (5,160 in women and 2,2920 in men)
  • – About 1,080 deaths (640 in women and 440 in men)
  1. 3. ANAL CANCER IS PREVENTABLE.

Like other forms of cancer fueled by HPV, the available HPV vaccine can likely cut down the risk of developing anal cancer in both men and women.

While HPV vaccination rates still arena��t anywhere near as high as wea��d like them to be, there is already evidence that the vaccine has lowered the risk of later cervical cancer in teen girls.

A growing number of gay physicians and health activists now believe that routine screening, using an anal pap smear, could reduce the incidence of anal cancer as dramatically as it has cervical cancer in women. They recommend that all MSMs, especially those who are HIV+, be tested every 1-3 years depending on their immunological well-being and CD4 count.

  1. 4. ANAL CANCER IS SCREENABLE.

In fact, a standardized screening protocol for anal cancer does not yet exist. Most health care providers are not offering anal cancer screening to their patients, either because they are unaware of the risk factors for anal cancer, do not inquire about their patients’ high risk sexual practices, and/or do not know how to perform an anal pap smear.

For women, a simple pap smear is used to detect these cell changes in the cervix in their early stages.

There seems to be little consensus on the practicality of offering anal pap smears to all clients, despite the fact that the AIDS Institute of New York recommends that HIV positive gay men “and others with history of HPV disease” should be tested annually. A�In addition, most health insurance policies do not cover anal pap smears.

  1. 5.A�ANAL CANCER IS ONLY A GAY DISEASE – MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN (MSM)

This is a big myth. Approximately 75% of all sexually active adults acquire HPV, often within the course of early adulthood, and often in the first two years of becoming sexually active and often without any symptoms.

Each year anal cancer is diagnosed in about 2 people out of every 100,000 people in the general population. Current estimates are that HIV negative MSMs are 20 times more likely to be diagnosed with anal cancer. Their rate is about 40 cases per 100,000. HIV-positive MSMs are up to 40 times more likely to diagnosed with the disease, resulting in a rate of 80 anal cancer cases per 100,000 people.

  1. 6.A�ANAL CANCER HAS VISIBLE SYMPTOMS.

Not always true. Although many men have no obvious symptoms, one of the most common manifestations of HPV infection is genital warts which can affect the anus, the penis and/or the peritoneum. Other possible symptoms are abnormal discharge from the anus, bleeding from the rectum and anus, itching of the anus, pain or pressure around the anus, and a sore or sores around the anus that do not heal.

  1. 7. Ia��M NOT PROMISCUOUS, SO I DONa��T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT HPV.

Wrong – HPV is transferable through skin to skin contact. So, yes, you reduce your chances of getting HPV if you practice safer sex and exercise monogamy when it comes to sexual partners.This means using a latex condom during anal and vaginal sex, and using a dental dam or a condom during oral sex. You can protect sex toys with a latex condom, too… and always make sure to change the condom or wash the toy if you switch from the vagina to the anus or the other way around.

However, STIs can be passed along as readily in a loving, long-term relationship as in a one-night stand. Remember, though, that HPV can infect areas that arena��t covered by a condom or dental dam, so safer sex isna��t foolproof.

Top HPV Cancer Myths - Genital, Anal, Penile Warts