Anal Warts & Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure – Treatment & Symptoms

Experiencing Pains ‘in the Buttock’?

One of the most typical health conditions confused with hemorrhoids is anal warts. They are sorta the same… yet they stem from entirely different causes and therefore are treated in very different methods. Anal warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus is highly contagious and often transmitted through sexual intercourse or skin-to-skin contact. An anal fissure is a small tear in the thin, moist tissue (mucosa) that lines the anus.

The major distinction of course is the occurrence of pain.

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Anal Pains & Conditions: Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Fissure

What are Anal Warts?

Anal warts (also called “condyloma acuminata”) are a condition that affects the area around and inside the anus. They may also affect the skin of the genital area. They first appear as tiny spots or growths, perhaps as small as the head of a pin, and may grow quite large and cover the entire anal area. They usually appear as a flesh or brownish color. Usually, they do not cause pain or discomfort and patients may be unaware that the warts are present. Some patients will experience symptoms such as itching, bleeding, mucus discharge and/or a feeling of a lump or mass in the anal area. Anal warts are caused by HPV and can be transmitted by direct contact ie. basically any contact exposure to the anal area (hand contact, secretions from a sexual partner) can result in HPV infection .

HPV infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

What are Anal Fissures?

An anal fissure is a small tear or crack in the lining of the anus. It may occur when passing large or hard stools, straining during childbirth, or experiencing bouts of diarrhea. An anal fissure is usually a minor condition that goes away within six weeks. Home treatments can help ease pain and promote healing.

Causes of Anal Fissure

Anal fissure can occur as a result of any circumstance that puts excessive pressure on the lining of the anus. Thus there are a variety of causes, which may include:

  • – Constipation with large or impacted stools
  • – Chronic or persistent diarrhea
  • – Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn’s disease)
  • – Childbirth
  • – Infections such as syphilis, herpes, HIV or tuberculosis
  • – Cancer

What are Hemorrhoids?

On the other hand, are a very painful condition. Symptoms of hemorrhoids are anal itching, pain (especially while sitting), blood on stool, and lumps near the anus. Increased pressure in the veins of the anus causes hemorrhoids. This is why hemorrhoids are common during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Hemorrhoids result from weak points in hemorrhoid veins below your skin or mucous tissue. As the weak spot gives way, it stretches out and takes surrounding tissue by using it. Traumatized hemorrhoids may get infected with a number of bacteria and/or viruses, but infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoid symptoms may include finding bright red blood on your toilet paper or seeing blood in the toilet after a bowel movement. Other common symptoms include rectal pain, pressure, burning, and itching. You may also be able to feel a lump in your anal area.

Hemorrhoids are common and usually not too serious. They can often be treated with home remedies, and you may not even need to be seen by a doctor.

But some symptoms of hemorrhoids, especially rectal bleeding, may also be caused by other diseases, some of them serious, like colon cancer.

Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure Treatment NYC

Treatment of Anal Conditions

Anal Warts Screenings, Tests & Checks:

Anal warts and hemorrhoids can both seem like lumps or masses of tissue round the anal area. However, there are difference scan result in a proper identification upon near inspection of the area.

Anal warts testing demands that your doctor may inquire as to the presence or absence of risk factors to include a history of anal intercourse, a positive HIV test or a chronically weakened immune system (medications for organ transplant patients, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, etc).

Anal warts’ physical examination should focus primarily on the anorectal examination and evaluation of the perineum (pelvic region) that includes the penile or vaginal area to look for warts.  Digital rectal examination should be performed to rule out any mass.  Anoscopy is typically performed to look within the anal canal for additional warts.  This involves inserting a small instrument about the size of a finger into your anus to help visualize the area.  Speculum examination may also be performed to aid in vaginal examination in women.

Hemorrhoids Treatment & Care:

Hemorrhoids, have a smooth texture that’s identical towards the tissue they originate from, regardless of whether that’s external skin or inner mucous membrane. They are often soft or “squishy” to touch, and they range in size from how big a pea to the size of the grape. You’ll never find them anywhere except right round the anal opening.

Hemorrhoids are usually best treated in your own home through a high-fiber diet, a proper amount of exercise, and easily obtained over-the-counter relief. Home remedies often work nicely on hemorrhoids and surgery is just rarely needed.

Hemorrhoids are often kept away by keeping the lifestyle changes that were made to assist cure them.

You should seek treatment for hemorrhoid symptoms if:

  • You have rectal bleeding for the first time.
  • You have heavy rectal bleeding.
  • – You have rectal bleeding that is not responding to home care.
  • – You have other hemorrhoid symptoms, such as pain, pressure, itching, and burning, that do not respond to home care after a few days.
  • – You have hemorrhoid symptoms along with other symptoms such as fever, weight loss, abdominal pain, or a change in bowel habits.

Anal Warts Treatment:

Anal warts, however, always have to be handled surgically, usually on an outpatient foundation. The warts will not go away by themselves. Instead, a physician has to make use of liquid nitrogen to freeze all of them off.

If warts are not removed, they can grow larger and multiply. Left untreated, warts may lead to an increased risk of anal cancer in the affected area. Internal anal warts may not respond to topical medications, so surgery may be required.

Anal warts will frequently come back for no cause under your control, because the virus can reside dormant in your skin cells for a long period. Post-treatment care and doctor’s supervision are often stressed to minimize chances of future outbreaks. When warts come back, they can usually be treated at your surgeon’s office. If a large number of new warts develop quickly, surgery may be needed again.

Treatment options for anal warts include:

  • Topical medication: These creams usually work best if the warts are very small and located only on the skin around the anus.
  • – Topical medications that will freeze the warts (liquid nitrogen)
  • – Topical medications that will burn the warts (Trichlorocetic acid, podophyllin)
  • – Surgery: When the warts are either too large for the above mentioned treatments or are internal, surgery is considered. During surgery, the warts are surgically removed. The patient will be anesthetized for the procedure. The type of anesthetic depends on the number and exact location of the warts being removed. When there are many warts, your surgeon may perform the surgery in stages.
  • – An internal examination will also be performed so that any lesions on the inside can also be found and treated.

 

Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure: Anal Conditions & Treatment

#NewYearNewYou – Annual Checkups, Health Screenings

New Year – Annual Checkups, Health Screenings

You’re in good health. You physically feel fine.

No colds and other medical ailments to date.

So, why should you see a doctor and/or specialist for annual check-up, testings or screenings? 

Getting annual check-ups, testings and/or screenings can inform, alert or provide insights of one’s health. Most people only have a test or screening if they have symptoms or risks factors. But in short, some medical issues come with little to no symptoms, while others can lay dormant and quiet for years without any precursors. For example, some common medical conditions including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes come with little to no signs or warnings, but usually made aware out of the result of another compromising factor.

However, other more pressing medical conditions such as HPV, skin & melanoma and cancers can linger for any duration of period within the body and without warnings.The key with managing these and many other diseases and conditions is to catch them early so they be managed and kept under control before they become serious threats to your health and well-being.

[embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ct7tQXg3RdU[/embedyt]

Age, Gender & Extracurricular Factors Play Risks.

A lot of what happens during your annual physical will depend on your age, gender, medical history and risk factors. Your doctor will check the condition of your heart, lungs, circulatory system and auditory system. You may need blood tests as follow-up.

Are your immunizations up-to-date? Some vaccinations you had as a child may require boosters. Depending on your age, your doctor also may recommend you get vaccinated against shingles, hepatitis A and B, human papilloma virus and pneumonia.

If you were born between 1945 and 1965, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends you be screened for Hepatitis C.

At your annual physical, your doctor also will check your height and weight and discuss lifestyle habits that can improve your health such as eating a heart-healthy diet and getting regular exercise.

Cancer Screenings are Vital.

In addition to your annual physical, it’s important you adhere to recommended cancer screenings for your age and gender. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against routine screening (total body examination by a doctor) to find skin cancers early for people who do not have a history of skin cancer and who do not have any suspicious moles or other spots. All others, report any unusual moles or changes in your skin to your doctor. Also talk to your doctor if you are at increased risk of skin cancer.

Each year more than a million people in the United States are diagnosed with the most common forms of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma — which together are known as non-melanoma skin cancers. Fortunately there are ways to detect most non-melanoma skin cancers early, when they are curable.

Genital human papilloma virus (HPV) is a very common virus. Some doctors think it’s almost as common as the cold virus. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that about 14 million people get a new HPV infection every year in the US. HPV vaccines can prevent infection with the types of HPV most likely to cause cancer and genital warts

  • – In women, the HPV test checks for the virus, not cell changes. The test can be done at the same time as the Pap test, with the same swab or a second swab. You won’t notice a difference in your exam if you have both tests. A Pap test plus an HPV test (called co-testing) is the preferred way to find early cervical cancers or pre-cancers in women 30 and older.
  • The American Cancer Society recommends that women aged 30 to 65 have an HPV test with their Pap test (co-testing) every 5 years to test for cervical cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider about co- testing. It’s also OK to continue just to have Pap tests every 3 years.
  • – Men are encouraged to have a prostate-specific antigen blood test and digital rectal exam to look for early signs of prostate cancer.

Sexual Testing & STD/STI Screenings.

Young adults under 25 have the highest rates of STIs, but you can get an STI at any point of age. The most common STIs include chlamydia, gonorrhoea, herpes, syphilis and genital, anal, or penile warts.

According to a latest studies which states that the number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among the 50 to 70 age group have soared by 38% in the last three years.

STI is an infection that you get from another person during sexual activity. Often this means that the virus, parasite, or bacteria is living in your sexual partner’s semen or vaginal fluid and gets into your body through your vagina, the urethra of your penis, your anus, or your mouth, but some are transmitted through skin to skin contact.

STIs only show up on the tests a few weeks after a potential incident. This is because these tests often aren’t looking for the virus or bacteria in your body. Instead, they search for the antibodies your immune system has created to fight off the invading infection. It takes your body a few days to create these antibodies, which means it takes time for the test to pick up on them.

Each STI has a different lag time between when you get it and when it will show up on a test.

  • You can test positive for gonorrhea or chlamydia in two weeks.
  • Syphilis can show up in one week or take three months to surface on a test.
  • HIV and Hepatitis B and C can show up as early as one month on a rapid test (the one that takes 20 minutes to get results), but in certain cases it can take six months to show.

Additional Health Tests & Procedures.

Some 30 million women in the United States have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men), according to the American Academy of Dermatology, though that figure does not include the millions more who struggle with thinning hair because of pregnancy, menopause, stress and other health conditions.

Platelet-rich plasma showing promising results treating hair loss. The non-surgical procedure uses platelet-rich plasma known as PRP. PRP is taken directly from the patient’s blood, then placed in a machine where it spins and separates. The platelets contain hundreds of proteins called growth factors which help heal injuries. For years, platelet-rich plasma has been used to treat tendon injuries in famous athletes like Tiger Woods and Victor Cruz. But now, doctors are using the healing properties to help regrow hair.

  • -Studies show PRP works best in thinning hair.

  • PRP Patients can expect 25-25% more growth and increased thickness in existing hair after treatment.

Currently Advanced Dermatology Associates is offering Free PRP Hair Restoration Therapy Consultation at 200 Central Park South, Suite 107. To schedule your hair consultation, please contact: prp.advderm@gmail.com

The art of living your optimum health basically begins with the actions you’ve already embarked upon. Start living your best life today. The key to living your best life is being able to live knowingly in control of whatever condition of illness you may be facing. The sooner you can can take control and manage your medical being; the earlier you can become more successful at managing and keeping watch as they become serious threats to your health.

 

Annual Checkups, Health Screenings - Checklist

 

Anal Sex Myths – Cancer, Infections & Prevention

ANAL SEX – Hidden Taboo… No More.

Anal sex was once a thing of hidden or shunned mystery indulged by a select few. However, anal sex is no longer quite the dreaded dark hidden taboo it once was.

An estimated 90% of men who have sex with men and as many as 5% to 10% of sexually active women engage in receptive anal intercourse. Not only has society become more accepting of the evolving relationships involving the same sex, but more heterosexual people are trying it and enjoying it more often than ever before. Recent surveys  estimate that 40 percent of women between the ages of 20 to 24 have tried anal sex, and 20 percent of all women have tried it in the last year.

However, there are still unclear truths or inaccurate facts (myths) around anal sex, anal cancer and the associated sexual infections. When it comes to anal sex and the topic of anal cancers, HPV; knowing the associated truths can make a difference in knowing the best methods of protection to decrease risks and treatment options.

ANAL SEX MYTHS: Cancer, Infections & Prevention

1. ANAL SEX CAUSES ANAL CANCER

Basically yes, anal sex is a risk factor for anal cancer.

Anal sex can transmit the human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV in turn leaves the cells around our rectum more vulnerable to mutating and becoming cancerous. A similar risk exists wherever HPV rears its ugly microscopic head, including the mouth, throat, and cervix. And because anal sex is generally more damaging to the inner lining of the rectum than the stereotypical notion of heterosexual sex is to the vagina, HPV and other sexually transmitted infections are more easily spread between people who engage in anal sex. Similarly, the greater number of sexual partners, the greater the risk of cancer.

2. ANAL CANCER RATES ARE ALARMING.

Close to 90 percent of anal cancer cases can be traced back to HPV. But the cancer itself is relatively rare.

More white women get HPV-associated anal cancer than women of other races. More black men get HPV-associated anal cancer than men of other races.

According to The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons:

  • – 8,000 people will be newly diagnosed with anal cancer this year.
  • – About 8,080 new cases (5,160 in women and 2,220 in men)
  • – About 1,080 deaths (640 in women and 440 in men)

3. ANAL CANCER IS PREVENTABLE.

Like other forms of cancer fueled by HPV, the available HPV vaccine can likely cut down the risk of developing anal cancer in both men and women.

While HPV vaccination rates still aren’t anywhere near as high as we’d like them to be, there is already evidence that the vaccine has lowered the risk of later cervical cancer in teen girls.

A growing number of gay physicians and health activists now believe that routine screening, using an anal pap smear, could reduce the incidence of anal cancer as dramatically as it has cervical cancer in women. They recommend that all MSMs, especially those who are HIV+, be tested every 1-3 years depending on their immunological well-being and CD4 count.

 

 4. ANAL CANCER IS SCREENABLE.

In fact, a standardized screening protocol for anal cancer does not yet exist. Most health care providers are not offering anal cancer screening to their patients, either because they are unaware of the risk factors for anal cancer, do not inquire about their patients’ high risk sexual practices, and/or do not know how to perform an anal pap smear.

While only one of these locations is screened routinely (the cervix), there are screening tests that you can request from your doctor for the other locations. For women, a simple pap smear is used to detect these cell changes in the cervix in their early stages.

There seems to be little consensus on the practicality of offering anal pap smears to all clients, despite the fact that the AIDS Institute of New York recommends that HIV positive gay men “and others with history of HPV disease” should be tested annually.  In addition, most health insurance policies do not cover anal pap smears.

5. ANAL CANCER IS GAY DISEASE – OR MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN (MSM)

This is a big myth. Approximately 75% of all sexually active adults acquire HPV, often within the course of early adulthood, and often in the first two years of becoming sexually active and often without any symptoms.

Each year anal cancer is diagnosed in about 2 people out of every 100,000 people in the general population. Current estimates are that HIV negative MSMs are 20 times more likely to be diagnosed with anal cancer. Their rate is about 40 cases per 100,000. HIV-positive MSMs are up to 40 times more likely to diagnosed with the disease, resulting in a rate of 80 anal cancer cases per 100,000 people.

6. ANAL CANCER HAS VISIBLE SYMPTOMS.

Not always true. Although many men have no obvious symptoms, one of the most common manifestations of HPV infection is genital warts which can affect the anus, the penis and/or the peritoneum. Other possible symptoms are abnormal discharge from the anus, bleeding from the rectum and anus, itching of the anus, pain or pressure around the anus, and a sore or sores around the anus that do not heal.

7.  I’M NOT PROMISCUOUS, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY.

Wrong – HPV is transferable through skin to skin contact. So, yes, you reduce your chances of getting HPV if you practice safer sex and exercise monogamy when it comes to sexual partners.This means using a latex condom during anal and vaginal sex, and using a dental dam or a condom during oral sex. You can protect sex toys with a latex condom, too… and always make sure to change the condom or wash the toy if you switch from the vagina to the anus or the other way around.

However, STIs can be passed along as readily in a loving, long-term relationship as in a one-night stand. Remember, though, that HPV can infect areas that aren’t covered by a condom or dental dam, so safer sex isn’t foolproof.

[embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vCKdG4Dc7I[/embedyt]

Preventing Anal Infection & Cancer

The only way to completely avoid anal sex risks is to abstain from anal sex. If you do engage in anal sex, it is always important to use a condom to protect against the spread of infections and diseases.

Sex Tips: Decreasing Anal Sex Risks

  • Avoid inserting a penis into the mouth or vagina after it’s been inserted in the anus until your partner puts on a new condom.
  • Use plenty of lubricant to reduce the risk of tissue tears. With latex condoms, always use a water-based lubricant.
  • Relax prior to insertion of the penis to help reduce the risk of tears. Taking a warm bath before anal sex or lying on your stomach may make insertion easier.
  • Stop if anal sex is painful.
  • If you experience bleeding after anal sex or you notice a sores or lumps around the anus or a discharge coming from it, see your doctor as soon as possible.

anal infection & diseases myths (1)

 

Top Anal Cancer Myths – HPV Video

Anal sex is no longer quite the dreaded dark hidden taboo it once was.

Not only has society become more accepting of the evolving relationships involving the same sex, but more heterosexual people are trying it and enjoying it more often than ever before. Recent surveys  estimate that 40 percent of women between the ages of 20 to 24 have tried anal sex, and 20 percent of all women have tried it in the last year.

When it comes to anal sex and the topic of anal cancers, the dialogues and conversations around HPV begin to drastically vary. Then the topic of those discussions begin to be shaped by many stigmas and false perceptions which aren’t always accurate, truthful or informative to our society’s best understanding.

[embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vCKdG4Dc7I[/embedyt]

In this blog, we discuss and share…..

The Top Anal Cancer Myths – video included

 

  1. 1. ANAL SEX CAUSES CANCER

In theory, this is yes, anal sex is a risk factor for anal cancer. Anal sex can transmit the human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV in turn leaves the cells around our rectum more vulnerable to mutating and becoming cancerous.

A similar risk exists wherever HPV rears its ugly microscopic head, including the mouth, throat, and cervix. And because anal sex is generally more damaging to the inner lining of the rectrum than the stereotypical notion of heterosexual sex is to the vagina, HPV and other sexually transmitted infections are more easily spread between people who engage in anal sex. Similarly, the greater number of sexual partners, the greater the risk of cancer.

  1. 2. ANAL CANCER RATES ARE ALARMING.

Close to 90 percent of anal cancer cases can be traced back to HPV. But the cancer itself is relatively rare.

According to The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons:

  • – About 8,080 new cases (5,160 in women and 2,2920 in men)
  • – About 1,080 deaths (640 in women and 440 in men)
  1. 3. ANAL CANCER IS PREVENTABLE.

Like other forms of cancer fueled by HPV, the available HPV vaccine can likely cut down the risk of developing anal cancer in both men and women.

While HPV vaccination rates still aren’t anywhere near as high as we’d like them to be, there is already evidence that the vaccine has lowered the risk of later cervical cancer in teen girls.

A growing number of gay physicians and health activists now believe that routine screening, using an anal pap smear, could reduce the incidence of anal cancer as dramatically as it has cervical cancer in women. They recommend that all MSMs, especially those who are HIV+, be tested every 1-3 years depending on their immunological well-being and CD4 count.

  1. 4. ANAL CANCER IS SCREENABLE.

In fact, a standardized screening protocol for anal cancer does not yet exist. Most health care providers are not offering anal cancer screening to their patients, either because they are unaware of the risk factors for anal cancer, do not inquire about their patients’ high risk sexual practices, and/or do not know how to perform an anal pap smear.

For women, a simple pap smear is used to detect these cell changes in the cervix in their early stages.

There seems to be little consensus on the practicality of offering anal pap smears to all clients, despite the fact that the AIDS Institute of New York recommends that HIV positive gay men “and others with history of HPV disease” should be tested annually.  In addition, most health insurance policies do not cover anal pap smears.

  1. 5. ANAL CANCER IS ONLY A GAY DISEASE – MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN (MSM)

This is a big myth. Approximately 75% of all sexually active adults acquire HPV, often within the course of early adulthood, and often in the first two years of becoming sexually active and often without any symptoms.

Each year anal cancer is diagnosed in about 2 people out of every 100,000 people in the general population. Current estimates are that HIV negative MSMs are 20 times more likely to be diagnosed with anal cancer. Their rate is about 40 cases per 100,000. HIV-positive MSMs are up to 40 times more likely to diagnosed with the disease, resulting in a rate of 80 anal cancer cases per 100,000 people.

  1. 6. ANAL CANCER HAS VISIBLE SYMPTOMS.

Not always true. Although many men have no obvious symptoms, one of the most common manifestations of HPV infection is genital warts which can affect the anus, the penis and/or the peritoneum. Other possible symptoms are abnormal discharge from the anus, bleeding from the rectum and anus, itching of the anus, pain or pressure around the anus, and a sore or sores around the anus that do not heal.

  1. 7. I’M NOT PROMISCUOUS, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT HPV.

Wrong – HPV is transferable through skin to skin contact. So, yes, you reduce your chances of getting HPV if you practice safer sex and exercise monogamy when it comes to sexual partners.This means using a latex condom during anal and vaginal sex, and using a dental dam or a condom during oral sex. You can protect sex toys with a latex condom, too… and always make sure to change the condom or wash the toy if you switch from the vagina to the anus or the other way around.

However, STIs can be passed along as readily in a loving, long-term relationship as in a one-night stand. Remember, though, that HPV can infect areas that aren’t covered by a condom or dental dam, so safer sex isn’t foolproof.

Top HPV Cancer Myths - Genital, Anal, Penile Warts

 

Casual Sex vs Relationship Sex

SEX – just as individuals, comes in all different shapes, sizes and types. From the start, as men and women, we’re wired differently and our manners in how we approach sex are as complex. In today’s world of choices, there’s more options on the table involving sex.

So before you jump head on into the heated sex conversation, let’s explore the differences in being in a casual sexual situation versus a committed/relationship sex. Depending on your current dating status, it’s a decision that could impact your health, life and future.

Which Yields More Tangible Returns – Casual Sex vs Relationship Sex?

Casual Sex – Basically, it’s the friends with benefits (FWB) or hookups –  or sexual activity that takes places outside of a romantic relationship and implies an absence of commitment, emotional attachment, or familiarity between sexual partners. Examples are sex in casual relationships, one-night stands, extramarital sex, prostitution, or swinging.

This doesn’t necessarily mean there’s no sense of responsibility or care. In a casual encounter you’re likely to focus on the here and now. You can enjoy the moment without much thought about what your partner thinks of you or what you think of them. Without the emotional complications of a relationship, you’re free to concentrate on physical satisfaction.

In casual sex, the relationship never changes because it’s just sex and either person can meet someone at any time and abandon the arrangement.

For many people, not being too familiar with the sex partner is the fuel to casual sex. They find the mystery exciting and, if there’s no chance of meeting again, inhibitions can easily be forgotten. You can role play as a new identity and act out a secret fantasy with little to NO fear of rejection.

Casual sex has risk, mystery, urgency and may focus on physical (sexual) satisfaction.

Danger is oftentimes a part of casual sex. There’s a sense yearning for being naughty, of tasting the forbidden fruit or someone else’s property. Some people enhance their sexual encounters by choosing public places or partners they feel should be off-limits.

As children, we’re told that casual sex is wrong or forbidden. Therefore, what’s more exciting than doing something so wrong.. When it feels so liberating?

In 2014, a study published in the Journal of Sex Research looked at single, heterosexual college students age 18 to 25. The research found that a greater proportion of men (18.6%) than women (7.4%) said they’d had casual sex in the past month. Unlike the 2009 study, researchers found that, regardless of gender, casual sex was negatively associated with psychological well being and positively correlated with psychological distress. Based on this, the research team concluded, “For emerging-adult college students, engaging in casual sex may elevate risk for negative psychological outcomes.”

Relationship Sex – in a committed or defined relationship – Relationship sex provides the opportunity to show affection and get as close as possible to one another.

During this period sex can be very exciting. There’s still some of the ‘mystery’ of casual sex and also some risk, but the difference is that sex is more mutual when people are “in love”, care about or have some bond of relationship.

Scientists have discovered that the biochemical state of falling in love is similar to obsessive compulsive disorder. • During this period sex can be very exciting. There’s still some of the mystery‟ of casual sex and also some risk, but the difference is that sex is more mutual when people are “in love”. When a relationship matures, sex matures. You now have the advantage of knowing each other well. Fear of rejection is replaced with trust and security.

This allows you to move into a stage of experimentation and mutual growth. You can take the time to fine-tune your skills as a lover.

In committed or relationship situation, the dynamics change. Each person has the ability to vocalize their wants from the relationship. A committed relationship is something you can discuss openly. Texting, Netflix and chilling – Don’t Make a Committed Relationship. It’s Communication.

Is Sexual Choice Influenced By Partner Supply.

Here’s where an established body of literature in sociology and demography – called mating market theory (MMT) – can help out. According to MMT, relationship preferences are expected to follow not simply from these fixed biological propensities, but also to be heavily influenced by partner availability.

If we think of the number of men and women in market terms, namely supply and demand, the rarer sex has more bargaining power in the market place. Individuals of the less numerous sex are more likely to get their way because they are awash with options. In theory, they can, if not pleased with a relationship, or terms therein, easily replace a disappointing partner.

The more abundant sex, by contrast, has fewer outside options and must cater to the preferences of the rarer sex.

For example, when there are extra women, men face a favorable market and can behave promiscuously, offering little parental investment to their mates. However, when women are in short supply, they can demand relationship faithfulness and commitment – with men responding because female partners are rare and therefore a valued resource. And if he’s out on the prowl, so may she be!

Remember Healthy Sex Is a Mind-Set.

Protect Yourself. Choose Your Sexual Partners Wisely.

The take-home point is this: context matters. Yes, men and women likely employ different strategies to find partners because of biological differences, but these strategies are strongly affected by partner availability and desires.

Consider that the choice you decide to take and understand the differences. Weigh out the best returns for yourself to fully understand where the best answer truly lies for you. It’s starts with  self-valuing yourself from the start.

 

casual-sex-vs-commitment-sex

The Lawrence Jaeger – Scholastic Achievement Award

The Lawrence Jaeger –  Scholastic Achievement

The Lawrence Jaeger Award for Scholastic Achievement created by Lawrence Jaeger, a well-respected New York City Dermatologist and owner of Advanced Dermatology Associates will be presented at the awards and graduation ceremonies at Bronx Latin School and the Bronx High School for Science. Two students were selected from the ranks of top performing New York City high school seniors to receive two-hundred-and fifty dollar scholarships for outstanding overall academic performance combined with excellence in core science curriculum. Administrators, teachers, and counselors at each school took part in the award selection process, and based their determination on academic achievement, community participation and leadership qualities. The two students receiving the awards are Khady Seck from The Bronx Latin School and Jennifer Lee from Bronx High School for Science.

Lawrence Jaeger has a long affiliation with The Bronx as a successful business owner and many of his employees are residents of the New York City borough. As the parent of two college bound students, he is acutely aware of the financial burden that families with children pursuing higher education will experience. He is optimistic that creating these awards to help defray educational costs will inspire other medical and business professionals to fund similar awards in their own local communities.

Lawrence Jaeger 2016 Scholastic Achievement Recipients-

2016 Lawrence Jaeger Scholastic Achievement-Bronx-Latin-High-School-

Lawrence Jaeger congratulates Khady Seck, a graduating senior at Bronx Latin High School, as the first recipient of this award for outstanding scholarship. Khady will attend SUNY Oswego as a member of the 2020 class to pursue a major in Biology. Her teachers and advisors at Bronx Latin attest to her determination to excel academically as well as her focus on service and leadership. She was inducted into the National Honor Society before her Sophomore year and served as Secretary in 11th grade. At the beginning of her Senior year was elected as National Honor Society Vice-President. Not only was she active in planning activities, fundraisers and helping to shape the future of the organization, she successfully advocated for the rights of students to volunteer in the NY Cares Program. Khady was selected as a Peer Mentor in the CFAS (College For Every Student), a mentoring program that pairs gifted students with middle students in need of guidance. Khady has exhibited tremendous growth, both personally and academically during her years at Bronx Latin. Lawrence Jaeger is proud to recognize her achievements and award her this scholarship.

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The second 2016 recipient of The Lawrence Jaeger Award for Scholastic Achievement is Jennifer Lee a graduating senior at The Bronx High School for Science. Jennifer excelled during her four years at The Bronx High School for Science, not only in academics as evidenced by her stellar GPA, but as an active member of the three season track team. She is a fierce competitor in individual events like the 600 meters and also participates in several relay events. Noted for her impeccable time management skills and leadership qualities, she is quick to point out that the sense of community she derived as an integral member of the track team was essential to her performance both on and off the field. Jennifer was also an active participant at The Giving Tree, a charity she volunteered at for the past four years. Dr. Lawrence Jaeger congratulates Jennifer on her past achievements and as well as those to come when she matriculates at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2016 with plans to major in Biology with a focus on pre-med.

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger –  Advanced Dermatology Associates 

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger is the founder and Medical Director of Advanced Dermatology Associates, a network of medical, surgical and cosmetic Dermatological treatment centers in Manhattan and the Bronx that has grown into the largest privately held Dermatology practice in New York. Larry Jaeger was born and raised in New York and has operated his Medical practice in New York City for over thirty years, employing over fifty physicians, physician assistants, and medical administrators. He enjoys widespread admiration from his peers and patients for providing affordable Dermatological care for patients in Manhattan and The Bronx. Dr. Larry Jaeger is lauded for adhering to treatment plans that address not only Dermatological symptoms, but also seek to eliminate underlying conditions and root causes of skin disorders.

Aside from owning and operating a successful Dermatology practice, Larry Jaeger is the principle partner of Prestige Healthcare Management Group, the largest private practice medical management group in New York. Prestige Healthcare offers medical professionals expert management and business analysis tools necessary for running a successful Healthcare practice. New and established practices benefit from comprehensive services designed by Lawrence Jaeger that allow physicians, medical practices and hospitals to streamline business and administrative tasks allowing them to concentrate on efficient patient care.